6 thoughts on “Bad Apple

    • Sorry to hear that. If it’s only 2 weeks old, it is still under warranty. Take it in to the Apple Store or contact Apple’s customer support. They will either fix it or replace it with a new one.

      I personally haven’t had a bad experience with Apple’s hardware. I own several Apple devices, and their quality has exceeded my expectations. My main gripe with Apple is that their stock apps aren’t very good. There’s also some things I don’t like about iOS. These are easily overcome. I often use third-party apps instead of Apple’s stock apps.

      In addition to all my Apple devices, I still have an iPhone 4 and iPad 2. Even though they’re old, they still work and the devices themselves are in mint condition. The battery life still lasts all day. I have found that Apple’s devices will live long past their obsolescence. That’s good for the customer and the environment.

  1. What do you think about the infamous “wifi greyed out on iPhone” issue? Is it a software or a hardware issue? Do you think Apple should have done a recall? Is there any longer-term way to fix the problem or do I really have to buy a new phone?

    • I actually wrote an article about this and it got a lot of traffic and comments, but I haven’t seen much activity in years. An average of 7 people read this article per day, down from a peak of 150. This tells me that the issue is pretty much over. They fixed it and eventually people moved on to new devices.

      I personally believe it is a combination of software and hardware. The devices overheated due to iOS updates which exposed an underlying manufacturing flaw. This is an intensive process that uses a lot of WiFi power while the iOS update is being downloaded. People tend to leave their device plugged in while they do these updates. Apple encourages this. If you do this on a hot day (major iOS releases launch in September) it makes these conditions worse. The WiFi module’s soldering connections end up expanding and breaking. People temporarily fix the issue by freezing their iPhone. Contraction temporarily fixes the issue. I STRONGLY RECOMMEND NOT DOING THIS!!!

      The traffic pattern around my article seems to confirm this. I always saw a huge spike in traffic to the relevant article shortly after an iOS update was released. People thought the software caused the defect, but freezing an iPhone doesn’t alter software. The iOS update was the coup de gras for a vulnerable iPhone, only because of the heat generated during the update process.

      I do think Apple could have handled this better. I am also surprised that no “Apple-gate” emerged from this issue. From what I understand, some people were able to have their iPhones replaced, even if they were no longer under warranty. Also, fixing the WiFi module is not expensive. When I looked into it, it cost about $50-60.

      The other guilty party is the end user. People use their iPhone constantly, it gets really hot, then they decide to plug it in and do a major iOS update. A lot of these people use cases that trap in heat. Apple does recommend removing cases before charging. But people are so addicted to their iPhone, they can’t let it cool down. They can’t charge it while it is turned off. They may miss something important on Twitter, after all. Then they complain about this or that breaking. Run your flat screen TV 24/7 and it probably won’t last long.

      The issue is the confluence of a manufacturing flaw that is exposed when people do a massive iOS upgrade. The thermal issues at play expand the WiFi connection to the breaking point. I have never experienced this issue because I always charge my iPhone when it is off. I charge it all the way, turn it on and then run the iOS upgrade when it is not charging.

  2. Apple’s decision to eliminate the functionality of arranging iPhone icons in iTunes is plain stupidity. Prior to 12.7 I was able to navigate my iPhone and arrange the Home Screen how I wished with ease. Now I have to use a manual method of dragging the app with my finger across the screen (which could mean over many pages) so as to connect with another app to create a folder. Simple action in the beginning has now been changed to a painstaking adventure in manual digit (finger) movement. Can not understand how this elimination would benefit iTunes. I ask that it be bought back to iTunes making the iPhone easier to use and manage.

    • Thank you for your well-written and insightful comment. You can give this feedback to Apple directly. I just wrote an article about how to submit a bug report to Apple. They take any product feedback through this mechanism.

      I get the feeling that Apple is phasing out iTunes. The writing is on the wall. The TV app and Apple Music are poised to supplant iTunes. The fact that they removed iPhone Home screen arrangement capabilities from iTunes seems to underscore this notion.

      Personally, I got sick of Home screen icons. I put all of my apps in one folder called “Apps” and moved it off the first Home screen, onto the second. I only have the four most-used apps in the Dock. I launch all other apps using Spotlight. It usually anticipates the app I want, so there’s little typing. If I need to launch an app that’s not immediately suggested, I type in one or two letters, and it’s there. It’s much easier than scanning the Home screens or tapping multiple times and scanning to reach an app within a folder.

      One annoyance with Spotlight is that they now hide all apps from search unless you turn them on. They just plopped this odd behavior in with one of the major iOS updates. For a while, it was just plain broken. Then they added the ability to toggle finding individual apps in Spotlight. So it’s a bit of a pain. One has to go to Settings > Siri & Search and turn on search-ability for each app. They’d never do something so idiotic with macOS.

      I removed the apps from the Home screen because it makes it easier to swipe down and launch Spotlight Search without accidentally tapping on an icon. (It doesn’t happen often, as Apple has fine-tuned their touch interface. When it happens, it’s usually when I’m tired and sloppy.) I can also enjoy the background, unobscured with stale icons. I am so tired of icons! I guess that makes me an iconoclast!

      Another method is to use Siri to launch apps. Just hold down the Home button (I actually use AssistiveTouch to launch Siri) and say “launch [app]” and it will pop up instantly. I’m amazed at how fast this is, even on my iPhone 6. (I really don’t care too much for the iPhone. I just bought a new MacBook Pro, but I probably won’t buy another iPhone for years, like many people. Hence, the 4+ year old iPhone 6.)

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